Beta-2 Glycoprotein 1 Antibodies

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Also known as: Anti-beta-2 glycoprotein 1; β2-glycoprotein 1 antibodies; Beta 2GP1 Ab
Formal name: Beta-2 Glycoprotein 1 Antibodies IgG, IgM and IgA
Related tests: Cardiolipin AntibodiesLupus AnticoagulantAntiphospholipid Antibodies, Anti-phosphatidylserine Antibodies, Anti-prothrombin Antibodies

At a Glance

Why Get Tested?

To help investigate inappropriate blood clot formation; to help determine the cause of recurrent miscarriage; as part of an evaluation for antiphospholipid syndrome (APS).

When to Get Tested?

When you have had one or more unexplained blood clots in a vein or artery; when you have had recurrent miscarriages, especially in the second and third trimesters.

Sample Required?

A blood sample drawn from a vein in your arm.

Test Preparation Needed?

None

The Test Sample

What is being tested?

This test detects and measures one or more classes (IgGIgM, or IgA) of beta-2 glycoprotein 1 antibodies. Beta-2 glycoprotein 1 antibody is one of three primary antiphospholipid antibodies, which are autoantibodies that target the body’s own lipid-proteins (phospholipids) found in the outermost layer of cells (cell membranes) and platelets. It is less common than the other two, cardiolipin antibody and lupus anticoagulant.

Antiphospholipid antibodies interfere with the body’s blood clotting process in a way that is not fully understood. Their presence increases a person’s risk of developing inappropriate blood clots (thrombi) in both arteries and veins. Antiphospholipid antibodies are most frequently seen in those with antiphospholipid syndrome (APS), an autoimmune disorder associated with blood clots (thrombotic episodes), a low platelet count (thrombocytopenia), or with pregnancy complications such as pre-eclampsia and recurrent miscarriages, especially in the 2nd and 3rd trimesters.

One or more antiphospholipid antibodies may also be seen with other autoimmune disorders, such as systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE).

How is the sample collected for testing?

A blood sample is obtained by inserting a needle into a vein in the arm.

Is any test preparation needed to ensure the quality of the sample?

No test preparation is needed.

The Test

Common Questions

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